Wine bottle stacker

André Gous shows you how to make a stylish wine rack from metal and wood.

 

Contacts

For more information on this or other metalworking projects contact André Gouws on 082-303-4830, 011-824-4995 or email metalandhome@telkomsa.net

Tools

Hammer

Tape measure

Clamps

Welding machine

Welding electrodes

Angle grinder

Vice

Vice-grip pliers

Pencil

Square

Materials

15 080mm of 10mm thick round bar

3 120mm of 8mm thick round bar

1 240mm of 20mm x 5mm flat bar

24 decorative buckles

Three pieces of 900mm x 114mm x 38mm wood

Project guide

Difficulty: Intermediate

Estimated time: 1 Day

Cost: R500

Step 1: For the wine racks legs, cut four pieces of 1 400mm each from the 10mm round bar.  Also from the 10mm round bar cut 24 pieces of 330mm each. These will be used for the rings to hold the wine bottles. From the remaining pieces of round bar cut six pieces of 260mm each. These will be used to connect the front and back legs.

 

Step 2: From the length of 8mm thick round bar cut 12 pieces measuring 260mm each.

 

Step 3: From the flat bar cut three pieces, two of them measuring 260mm each and one piece measuring 720mm.

 

Step 4: Now it is time to shape the four 1 400mm pieces of round bar into legs. Each of the pieces gets a curl on both ends, but they face opposite directions. On the ends that will be the feet the curls need to be a bit bigger than the ones at the top. Keep working at it until all four of the legs match each other. From top to bottom the legs should measure 700mm.

 

Step 5: To hold the bottles of wine in place, roll 24 rings from the 330mm lengths of round bar. The completed rings should have a diameter of about 105mm.

 

Step 6: Once all 24 rings are rolled, use the rings to construct four pyramids consisting of six rings each. To ensure everything is square, draw some guidelines on your work surface. The pyramid of rings should be three tiers high. Three rings at the top, two in the middle and one at the bottom.

 

Place the three rings at the top in line with your guideline. Position the rings against each other so that the openings face inward. Once finished, place the four pyramids on top of each other to make sure they match.

 

Step 7: Take two of the pyramids and place them next to each other so that the tiers with the three rings touch each other and weld them together. Do the same with the other two pyramids.

 

Step 8: Weld two of the legs onto one set of the joined pyramids. These will be the back legs of the wine rack. The distance from the ground to the first ring should be 160mm.

 

Step 9: On the pair of legs you welded to the pyramids in step 8, weld the six 260mm pieces of round bar. These six pieces will connect the front legs to the back legs. Start from the bottom and measure 200mm upwards on both legs to get the position for the first piece of round bar. For the second piece, measure a further 220mm upwards and for the third piece, a further 110mm.

 

Step 10: Take the loose set of triangles and decide which side you want to be the front, then place that side on the work surface. From underneath place the decorative buckles where you welded the rings together. Now weld the decorative buckles onto the rings so that all the welds and gaps are hidden.

 

To weld the decorative buckles correctly onto the rings already welded onto the legs, turn it so it stands on the six pieces of round bar. From underneath place the buckles in position and support it with something to keep it in place while you weld it to the rings.

 

Step 11: Use a hammer to bend the open ends of the decorative buckles closed.

 

Step 12: Weld the second pair of rings onto the six pieces of round bar. Place the first set of rings on your work surface so that the six round bars face upwards. On the six pieces of round bar, measure 160mm upwards from the legs to get the position where the second set of rings should be welded.

 

Use something like a G-clamp to support the rings while you weld them. You will notice the round bars protrude beyond the second set of rings. This is to ensure the wine bottles do not protrude beyond the actual wine rack and avoid the risk of the bottle necks being broken off when someone walks past.

 

Tip

You will notice the round bars protrude beyond the second set of rings. This is to ensure the wine bottles do not protrude beyond the actual wine rack and avoid the risk of the bottle necks being broken off when someone walks past.

 

Step 13: Weld the two remaining legs onto the ends of the six pieces of round bar.

 

Step 14: Take the 12 pieces of 8mm round bar you cut earlier, and from one side on each of the pieces measure 30mm. On this mark, bend each of the pieces 90 degrees so that it forms an L-shape.

 

Step 15: In the 720mm length of flat bar, drill twelve 8mm holes. From the left-hand side measure 75mm to the right for the centre position of the first hole. From here measure 31mm for the centre position of the second hole. Repeat these measurements to get the positions for the rest of the holes. These will be the wine glass holders.

 

Step 16: Weld the two remaining 260mm pieces of flat bar onto the sides of the 720mm flat bar.

 

Step 17: Weld the U-shape with the wine glass holders between the front and back legs of the wine rack. Position it so it is in the centre.

 

Step 18: Give the entire wine rack a thorough sanding to get rid of any rust, welding spatter and flux before it gets its paint job. You can obviously decide which colour you want to make it. This one was sprayed in matt black.

 

Tip

You can spray the 24 decorative buckles another colour to make them stand out more.

 

Step 19: The last step is to mount the three pieces of wood to the top of the wine rack. Drill a few extra holes in the pieces of flat bar and secure the wood from underneath with screws.